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Most Common Causes and Risk Factors of Spinal Stenosis


2. Primary vs. Acquired

We can categorize the causes of spinal stenosis two ways, as either primary or acquired. A primary cause of this condition means that it’s congenital, which basically means you were born with it. This can happen. For some people, there is no rhyme or reason why they have spinal stenosis — they were simply born with a more narrow spinal canal than others. “This is a form of inherited spinal stenosis called short pedicle syndrome,” writes Spine Universe. “The signs or symptoms of primary spinal stenosis may not become apparent until adulthood; during mid-life years.”

The next type is acquired which means the person was not born with spinal stenosis, they developed it at some point in their life as a result of aging, disease, or injury.

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