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7 Facts on Hemophilia and Inherited Bleeding Disorders


What if a simple cut on your arm became a life-threatening episode? That’s the reality for those living with hemophilia, a disorder that prevents the normal clotting of blood from an injury, making the bleeding more exaggerated than in a healthy individual.

The condition is relatively rare in the U.S., with about 20,000-cases, according to the National Hemophilia Foundation. Around the world, that number is estimated to be around 400,000. However, while it doesn’t affect a large portion of the population, it has its own day to mark—World Hemophilia Day was earlier last week, April 17. Here are seven things to know about it…

 

1. There are Two Main Types

Hemophilia, a term that covers a range of inherited bleeding disorders, is broken down into two main categories: hemophilia A and hemophilia B (the latter also known as Christmas disease). The two are “distinguished by the specific gene that is mutated,” according to MedicineNet.com.

There is also a hemophilia C, but it is less severe than type A or B, adds the source. Hemophilia A is about 4-times more common than B. How each type affects the patient can differ from case to case.

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