Cholesterol

Foods to Help Lower Cholesterol

Cholesterol gets a bad rap. In fact, our bodies actually produce a certain amount of HDL (or good) cholesterol. Cholesterol is made up of a waxy substance travels through the blood, helping in the production of some hormones and vitamin D, and keeping our arteries clear.

It is the dietary choices we make every day that contribute to our elevated LDL (or bad) cholesterol levels. When bad cholesterol gets too high, it starts to build up in the arteries, creating the plaques that cause heart disease. That’s why it’s vital to be active every day and eat a healthy diet that’s low in LDL cholesterol—to encourage weight loss and keep our cholesterol levels within a healthy range. A diet rich in the following 10 heart-healthy foods can actually help you lower bad cholesterol…

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Fish

You might think that fatty fish—like salmon, tuna or sardines—is bad for the old ticker, but more seafood in your diet is actually good for your ticker. Why? Because fatty-fish filets of albacore tuna and salmon are rich sources of omega-3 fatty acids, which lower triglycerides (unsaturated fat) in the blood and heart.

Recommendations from the American Heart Association suggest a minimum of two servings of 3.5-ounces (or 3/4-cups) of fatty fish per week. Fatty fish species, such as herring, salmon, sardines, albacore tuna, and mackerel are rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which protect heart health. If you don’t dig fish, talk to your doctor about taking omega-3 fatty acid supplements.

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Julie Ching, MS, RDN, CDE

Julie Ching, MS, RDN, CDE

Julie Ching is a Registered Dietitian and Certified Diabetes Educator in Los Angeles. She decided to become a Dietitian after traveling through Europe, South America, and Asia and discovered a passion for food. She now works with people of all ages and varying disease states to improve their health. She is passionate about teaching people about nutrition so they can live their best life while still considering their cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds.

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