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Regular Use of Aspirin Linked to Macular Generation

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Researchers have found that regular Aspirin usage can triple the risk of developing “wet” age-related macular degeneration (wet AMD), a condition that blurs the central vision over time, and is linked to the leading cause of blindness mainly in seniors.

Wet AMD is an irreversible condition that currently impacts more than one quarter of a million elderly individuals in Britain. However, the scary thing about this disease is that scientists have linked it’s onset to daily Aspirin usage. And as you know, Aspirin is a popular over-the-counter remedy used to treat headaches and general aches and pains—as well as one that’s commonly prescribed by health care providers to help lessen the risk of serious conditions like heart attack and stroke.

An academic study monitored 2,400 individuals, ranging from middle-aged (minimum 49-years of age) to seniors, over a period of 15 years. It was noted at the start that 257 study participants took Aspirin at least once a week. The remainder of participants only took ASA occasionally for headaches, etc. When the study concluded, scientists found that only one in 27 of the “occasional” Aspiring user group developed wet AMD. However, one in 10 regular Aspiring users developed web AMD.

This is surprising news for medical professionals who prescribe Aspirin as a daily preventive medicine to thwart heart attack and stroke, or to help fight cancer tumors.

Source: Calgary Herald

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